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Animal shelter dogged with adoptable pets

Matthew Hoekstra photo Sonya Kamp with Coco, Gypsy, Goomer and Skyler outside the Richmond Animal Shelter. Shelter staff are urging potential dog owners to consider adopting from the shelter, which offers a temporary home to surrendered animals and strays. - Matthew Hoekstra photo
Matthew Hoekstra photo Sonya Kamp with Coco, Gypsy, Goomer and Skyler outside the Richmond Animal Shelter. Shelter staff are urging potential dog owners to consider adopting from the shelter, which offers a temporary home to surrendered animals and strays.
— image credit: Matthew Hoekstra photo

Skyler, Goomer and Gypsy are among a few dozen dogs awaiting adoption at a crowded Richmond Animal Shelter.

Shelter staff are urging potential dog owners to consider adopting from the shelter, which offers a temporary home to surrendered animals and strays.

“Spring is coming and generally people are more keen to adopt dogs, and because the shelter is reaching a point of being full, we’re really trying to make a push to find the right homes for these guys,” said Sonya Kamp, shelter manager.

Dogs calling the shelter home range in age from three months to 14 years and in size from small to large.

“We basically have anything that anyone is looking for,” said Kamp.

Shelter animals are already spayed or neutered, vaccinated, dewormed and tattooed, and dogs are generally house-trained.

Operated by Richmond Animal Protection Society, the shelter also offers training for the pet and home, said Kamp.

Dogs waiting for homes include Coco, a surrendered six-month-old Australian shepherd-lab cross; Blackberry, a one-year-old medium-sized dog; and Gabby, a seven-year-old Rottweiler—suitable for a slower-paced family.

Available pets can be viewed at the shelter or online. Potential owners then consult with shelter staff before one-on-one meetings with dogs. If there’s a match, an application is filled out and shelter staff perform a home check before the adoption is finalized.

Kamp’s advice to potential owners is be honest about what they can offer their new best friend.

“I always recommend that people don’t try to make a New Year’s resolution and then get a dog to fit that resolution.”

The shelter is located at 12071 No. 5 Rd. Hours are noon to 5:30 p.m. weekdays and noon to 4:30 p.m. weekends.

Richmond Animal Protection Society is also hosting a fundraising pub night March 5, 7 p.m., at Replay Lounge, 2611 Viscount Way.

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