Richmond Review

Gary Law upset Liberals cancelled nomination meeting

Long-time Richmond resident Gary Law said he was shocked to learn that the B.C. Liberals were cancelling the nomination meeting for Richmond-Centre and bringing in another candidate, Teresa Wat. He
Long-time Richmond resident Gary Law said he was shocked to learn that the B.C. Liberals were cancelling the nomination meeting for Richmond-Centre and bringing in another candidate, Teresa Wat. He's now mulling his options, and will be consulting with supporters before announcing his next movi.
— image credit: Martin van den Hemel photo

The man who strongly urged Gary Law to reconsider a career in politics, not long before Law began receiving threats via text and cell phone, described himself as an influential member of the B.C. Liberal Party, Law revealed at a press conference on Friday afternoon.

Law said he was upset and shocked by the Liberal Party's announcement on Wednesday that it was cancelling an upcoming nomination meeting, and instead bringing an outside candidate into Richmond to vie to become the next MLA for Richmond Centre, and replace the soon-to-retire Rob Howard.

"Most of the people in the community know that I have a heart to serve individual groups and also organizations within the community," Law said, adding he hoped to devote himself fully to serve the community by running for office.

Law had hoped the community would decide on who the best candidate would be for the riding, during a Liberal nomination meeting.

Instead, on Wednesday, the B.C. Liberals brought in an outside candidate, Teresa Wat, to run as Richmond Centre MLA.

"I must say that I'm very disappointed by the decision which was made by the B.C. Liberal Party on... Jan. 16 as I feel that I'm not being treated fairly and I do not receive any respect at all," Law said.

In October of 2012, Law said that Richmond-Steveston MLA John Yap introduced him to high ranking officers of the B.C Liberal Party.

But the situation made a dramatic turn in mid-December.

"In mid December I had been demanded by a member in the (Liberal) party to withdraw my nomination application. Immediately after, I had received threats through text messages and phone calls," he said, noting the case is under investigation by Richmond Mounties.

Law said he did not receive formal notification of the status of his nomination application until about 20 minutes before Premier Christy Clark made Wednesday's public announcement that Wat would be running for the Liberals.

"I am extremely frustrated to see this happen to the Richmond community," he said, adding that he believes Richmond's Liberal Party members deserved the right to vote for who they thought would be best suited for the job.

Law immigrated to Canada 30 years ago, and has immersed himself in many community activities, then joined the RCMP in 1995, and became an army reserve officer.

What's next for Law?

He'll be consulting his supporters, before deciding whether to run for another political party.

It's a decision he said he'll be making shortly, and he did not rule out the option of running as an independent.

Law took a leave of absence from the Burnaby RCMP last November to pursue his political aspirations. He was working there as a corporal, in charge of the detachment's auxiliary police officers program.

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